September 6, 1757 – May 20 1834

Marie-Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, marquis de la Fayette (September 6 1757 – May 20 1834) was a French and also Amerideserve to armed forces officer and also aristocrat who participated in the American radvancement as a general and served in the Estates General and also the succeeding National Constituent Assembly in the early on phases of the French revolution.

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If the liberties of the Amerideserve to people are ever before ruined, they will certainly fall by the hands of the Romish clergy.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Though Lafayette, himself a Romale Catholic, might conceivably have actually sassist something translatable as this, the earliest source yet found for this is an anti-catholic pamphlet The Future Conflict : An Address, (1878), by Order of the American Union, p. 20, without any type of citation of original resources. It has actually also been quoted as: "If the liberties of the Amerideserve to human being are ever damaged, they will loss by the hands of the clergy."

True republicanism is the sovereignty of the human being. There are herbal and imprescriptible civil liberties which a whole nation has actually no right to violate, simply as national sovereignty is over the second agreements of the government.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Speech (3 January 1834), quoted in Lafayette in Two Worlds: Public Cultures and Personal Identities in an Age of Revolutions (1999), p. 256

Liberty consists in the flexibility to carry out whatever which injures no one else; thus the exercise of the natural legal rights of each male has no limits except those which assure to the various other members of the culture the enjoyment of the exact same rights.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Declaration of the Rights of Man, 1789

No one deserves even more than he the esteem which he enjoys right here. He is a prodigy for his age, complete of courage, soul, judgment, excellent manners, feelings of generosity and also of zeal for the cause of liberty on this continent.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Baron Johann de Kalb, creating to the French War Department, as quoted in George Washington"s Generals and Opponents : Their Exploits and Leadership (1994) by George Athan Billias, p. 219

I would never have actually drawn my sword in the reason of America, if I can have actually conceived that thereby I was founding a land also of slaexceptionally.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Letter to Thomas Clarkboy

Humanity has won its suit and also liberty will never before more desire an asylum.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— As quoted in Journal of Proceedings and Addresses (1891) by National Educational Association, p. 107

Till the hour when the trump of the Archangel shall sound to announce that Time shall be no more, the name of Lafayette shall stand enrolled upon the annals of our race, high on the list of the pure and disinterested benecomponents of mansort.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— John Quincy Adams? in an address to the US Congress (31 December 1834)

Lafayette valued reputation and glory, but cared little for the power that mainly results from them. Having sooner or later been asked who was in his opinion the biggest male of this age: "In my idea," replied he, "General Washington is the best man, for I look upon him as the many virtuous."

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Jules Germain Cloquet, in Recollections of the Private Life of General Lafayette (1836), Vol. I, p. 24

I check out, I study, I research, I listen, I reflect, and also out of every one of this I try to develop an concept into which I put as much prevalent sense as I deserve to. I shall not sheight much for are afraid of saying foolish things; I will danger still less for fear of doing them, for I am not disposed to abusage the confidence which they have deigned to show me. Such is the conduct which until currently I have followed and will follow.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Letter to his father-in-law, the Duc d"Ayan (4 December 1776), as quoted in George Washington"s Generals and Opponents : Their Exploits and Leadership (1994) by George Athan Billias, p. 219

He devoted himself, his life, his fortune, his hereditary honors, his towering ambition, his splendid hopes, all to the reason of liberty. He came to an additional hemispbelow to protect her. He came to be one of the a lot of reliable champions of our Independence; but, that once achieved, he went back to his own nation, and also thenceforward took no part in the controversies which have actually split us.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— John Quincy Adams? in an resolve to the US Congress (31 December 1834)

Lafayette is a young guy of royal birth, through liberal politics and what Jefferkid later called "a canine appetite for fame." Someone shelp he was "a statue looking for a pedestal." But he was intoxicated via, a fairly theoretical love of, liberty. It was theoretical bereason liberty wasn"t known to many Europeans. was a great romantic and he dropped in love through America, the concept of America that the French had. This wild new human being wright here you can begin the human being over, to use Tom Paine"s phrase.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Ricdifficult Norton Smith, quoted in Chronicle of the Revolution at PBS

Humanity has actually gained its suit; Liberty will nevereven more be without an asylum.

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Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Letter to friends (1780), publiburned in Memoirs de La Fayette Vol. II, p. 50, quoted in Martin"s History of France : The Decline of the French Monarchy (1866) by Henri Martin, Vol. II, p. 418— Variant translations:— Humanity has actually got its suit : Liberty will never before more be without an asylum.As quoted in Oration on the Hundredth Anniversary of the Surrender of Lord Cornwallis to the Integrated Forces of America and France: At Yorktown, Virginia, 1ninth October, 1781: Delivered at Yorktvery own, 1nine October, 1881 (1881), by Robert Charles Winthrop, p. 53

When the federal government violates the people"s legal rights, insurrection is, for the civilization and also for each percent of the world, the a lot of sacred of the legal rights and the many indispensable of duties.

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Speech to the Constituent Assembly (20 February 1790), as quoted in Famous Sayings and also their Authors (1906) edited by Edward Latham— This has actually sometimes been misquoted without qualifying conmessage as "Insurrection is the holiest of duties."

Lafayette, nous voilà!

Lafayette, Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis De— Lafayette, we are here!Charles E. Stanton, an aid to General John J. Pershing in an resolve before the tomb of Lafayette (4 July 1917). Pershing is frequently credited with the renote, periodically upon arriving in France with the American Expeditionary Force, however he himself stated: "Many type of have attributed this striking utterance to me and also I have often wimelted that it might have been mine, however I have no recollection of saying anypoint so splendid. I am certain that those words were spoken by Colonel Stanton and to him should go the crmodify for coining so happy and felicitous a phrase."